The Vendor-Client Relationship – in Real-world Situations

I found this video as torturous as it was funny, for various reasons, but figure that most of my colleagues would get a good kick out of it. Especially on the heels of the Win Without Pitching manifesto—which friends and [d]online readers replied in unison ‘In a perfect world…”—these two posts have really made me stand back and think about how our industry differs from many others.

That’s all I feel comfortable saying on the subject, in such a public forum, though.

20 Replies to “The Vendor-Client Relationship – in Real-world Situations

  1. I actually covered my eyes and laughed in agony. I can’t stand clients like this.

  2. That sounds about right lol. Especially the part at the end about showing them how to do it so they can do it in-house next time.

    Ah, that’s classic.

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  4. Having once been a building contractor, I can tell you it’s much the same thing. I don’t know why it is that some trades are considered kosher for haggling like this, and others aren’t. You don’t haggle for pizza, at the supermarket, the gas station, or even the hair dresser, but it’s perfectly acceptable to do it to the guy who’s putting wires and pipes through your house or who has total control over your web site and tons of sensitive private data.

  5. i’m with jacob. wish i had seen this when i was starting off–lost so much money to people like this!

    mad, we’re under-appreciated!

  6. Very entertaining, and yes a bit uncomfortable to watch.
    BTW, the small grey text on this site is quite hard to read.

  7. OMG – this is sooooo on target…think of our recent history. I should put this on my site, if I weren’t afraid of really freaking out potential clients.

  8. omg, that was painfully funny. I’m going to request that my students watch this, before they accept their first gigs, so they dont have to learn the hard way, like so many of us have.

  9. omg and how about those saucy vendors who start out the conversation with ‘what’s your budget’ so they can match (but just a little under) what the client can spend.

  10. It kind of makes you wish they could see how ridiculous it would be if they tried that stuff in everyday situations. Why should we be any different?

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