US Banknote Designs, by Dowling Duncan

With their vertical format bills, Dowling Duncan have reignited interest in The Dollar Redesign Project. The following description is from Dowling Duncan:  Read more

Hearts of Brooklyn Wine Labels

Hearts of Brooklyn

Red White and Bubbly’s Adam Goldstein hired ERA404 to design the labels for three new wines: The Hearts of Brooklyn Series. ERA404 previously designed the packaging for Brooklyn Wine Company’s Feliz Label Collection and Sparkling White, Altamira’s Sangiovese, and for Pangea’s Sparkling Natural Spring Water.

Illustration for the new pieces was provided by Ryan Seslow. The designs have been applied to packaging, posters, and billboards around Brooklyn.

Horrorgami

If you thought the only thing scary about paper was the occasional paper cut, think again. Paper Dandy’s Horrorgami brings the screams with 20 spooky kirigami (cut-and-fold) designs. Each project comes with a precise template and clear instructions with plenty of photos of the entire process and all the ghoulish-greatness of the finished project, so you’ll know you’re on the right track. From Gallows Hill to Dr. Frank-n-Furter’s castle, every Horrorgami project has been meticulously designed by noted paper artist Marc Hagan-Guirey, who has exhibited his horror-themed paper sculptures all over the world.

While Horrorgami‘s extremely thorough instructions make these projects great for beginners and seasoned paper veterans alike, there is quite a bit of cutting required and it may not be the best solo project for children.

(via Colossal)

Unique Business Cards

(via ViralNova)

Les Couleurs

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau (Treaty of colors used to paint water), was probably the most comprehensive guide to paint and color of its time. According to Medieval book historianErik Kwakkel who translated part of the introduction, the color book was intended as an educational guide. The irony being there was only a single copy that was probably seen by very few eyes.

It’s hard not to compare the hundreds of pages of color to its contemporary equivalent, the Pantone Color Guide, which wouldn’t be published for the first time until 1963.

The book is currently kept at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France.

(via This is Colossal)