Fore-Edge Paintings in 19th Century Books

Fore-edge painting, which is believed to date back as early as the 1650s, is a way of hiding a painting on the edge of a book so that it can only be seen when the pages are fanned out. There are even books that have double fore-edge paintings, where a different image can be seen by flipping the book over and fanning the pages in the opposite direction.

(via This is Colossal)

Sketchbook 4

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Well, another year and I’ve got another sketchbook to show for it. I don’t know if you got a chance to see the previous sketchbook 1sketchbook 2, sketchbook3, or the illustrations I did for the global investment project, or the illustrations I created to accompany my short story, “The Change“, or the tarot cards that we created for Tina’s birthday. If you didn’t, have a look. Anyway, enjoy these sketches too. Read more

William Legoullon’s Microscopic Drinks

I posted a gallery back in July of last year about Caren Alpert’s microscopic food photos. It seems that Mr. Legoullon’s taking a page from her book to showcase the microscopic photography of popular beverages (coffee, tea, wine, beer and cola). Although they’re not as vivid as Ms. Alpert’s work, they’re still exceptionally beautiful.

Read about the project on Legoullon’s site.