Artistic masterpieces rendered in Pantone swatches

Just the other day, Pantone named Marsala the color of 2015, and the decision, er, “has critics seeing red.” The only thing that gets art and design people more worked up than Pantone swatches is the rampant overuse of Comic Sans. Art and design people LOVE Pantone. … thus it was inevitable that someone would do what London artist Nick Smith did, and create quasi-“pixelated” versions of famous art masterpieces, only using Pantone swatches.

Smith currently has an exhibition called “Psycolourgy” at the Lawrence Alkin Gallery near Covent Garden. The show runs through February 20.

Make your own Pantone Masterpiece:
http://www.instamosaic.com/

(via Dan and dangerousminds.net)

Les Couleurs

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau (Treaty of colors used to paint water), was probably the most comprehensive guide to paint and color of its time. According to Medieval book historianErik Kwakkel who translated part of the introduction, the color book was intended as an educational guide. The irony being there was only a single copy that was probably seen by very few eyes.

It’s hard not to compare the hundreds of pages of color to its contemporary equivalent, the Pantone Color Guide, which wouldn’t be published for the first time until 1963.

The book is currently kept at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France.

(via This is Colossal)

56 Months of Pantone Moods

If you haven’t already checked it out, the Pantone Moods Facebook application that was conceived and created by ERA404, has a history and trends tab. The trends tab shows current mood matches, based on color, mood blurb, gender, date/time of submission, and distance from you. It also compares your current mood color and blurb based on gender, location, color match, word match, and frequency. Lastly, it shows global mood trends with the most active gender (female) and color (21-1-7 C), most active location (São Paulo) and color (21-1-7 C), most popular color now (1-1-6 C) and of all time (21-1-7 C), and most popular words (color, blue, feeling, today, happy) and colors (21-1-7 C, 76-1-7 C, 1-1-6 C, 132-1-4 C).
Read more

Underpantones

Underpantones

Personally, I think it’s a good idea they didn’t decide to name the product: PMS Underwear. From the manufacturer web site:

“Suddenly, the Pantone brand is everywhere. Overuse? Maybe. But, as they say, if you can’t beat ‘em… so, over a few beers, we decided to add to the products on offer. Ladies and gentlemen, for him and for her, we present underpantones (and, of course, pantytones)! If we had our way it’s what every well-dressed designer would be wearing.”

(via Gret)

PANTONE® Moods Widget

Maybe you’ve noticed that colorful rotating widget to the left of this post (when this post was on the home page). That cool little plug-in was created for PANTONE® as part of our Facebook Moods project. The two panels show realtime Moods posted to Facebook, and a digest of the previous day’s most popular color, keyword and city. In terms of cities and their magnitude of Moods posted, by the way, São Paulo has got us beat by almost 400%:

Popular Locations/Colors

You can see all Pantone Moods trends by clicking here, after you’ve logged in to Facebook and approved the application. And, naturally, you can see your mood show up on the widget simply by posting a new one and waiting for the widget to cycle through the most recent 15 moods posted.

Anyway, I’m curious to hear what you think about the widget. Drop me a line or post a comment below.