William Legoullon’s Microscopic Drinks

I posted a gallery back in July of last year about Caren Alpert’s microscopic food photos. It seems that Mr. Legoullon’s taking a page from her book to showcase the microscopic photography of popular beverages (coffee, tea, wine, beer and cola). Although they’re not as vivid as Ms. Alpert’s work, they’re still exceptionally beautiful.

Read about the project on Legoullon’s site.

Captured: America in Color from 1939-1943

These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations. The photographs are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.

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Lee Jeffries’ Haunting Homeless Photos

The homeless rarely find themselves in the limelight, but amateur photographer Lee Jeffries has made them the focus of his work. He’s produced a haunting set of black-and-white portraits of people living on the streets of Europe and the U.S. Every face is shown in incredible detail and is full of emotion. More after the jump.

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Sightsmap

Using geo data from photos uploaded by users to Google’s Panoramio, Sightsmap generates an interactive heatmap of the most frequently photographed spots around the world. It reminds me a little of the Heat Map I made back in 2006, which could be applied to any geolocational data (including photos).

Bruce Davidson: 1980s NYC Subway Photos

I found these originally on Flavorwire and fell in love with Bruce Davidson‘s collection of photos of NYC Subway photos from the 1980s. They remind me of the gritty, realistic eyes of Melissa Weimer’s Lake. Sky. Vans and Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe‘s latest Anthology: Faces, Places, Spaces.  Here’s an excerpt from the original article:

Children hovering by the subway window to the glow of Coney Island’s Wonder Wheel. A man cowering from a pointed gun. A young vandal at work in a tagged subway car. A punk brooding at a station. In the mid-80s, photographer Bruce Davidson captured New York City’s subway commuters in a ground-breaking series first published by Aperture, freezing the subject in powerful, split-second vignettes.

The Illinois-born photographer has described his subjects as “the people in the subway, their flesh juxtaposed against the graffiti, the penetrating effect of the strobe light itself, and even the hollow darkness of the tunnels, inspired an aesthetic that goes unnoticed by passengers who are trapped underground, hiding behind masks, and closed off from each other.” Decades later, the images seem familiar yet distant, cinematic yet tangible. See flash-frightened women in furs and vigilante crime patrollers in our gallery and look for the third edition of Subway available soon from Aperture.