NYC Subway Construction, by Pierre and Granville Pullis

Pierre Pullis had a photography studio on Fulton Street, in New York City, but he spent a lot of time working outside its walls. For about four decades in the first half of the 20th century, he lugged his camera to some rather inconvenient places around the city—including beneath its boulevards. Read more

Rare Vintage NYC Subway Trains, by Danny Lyon

Photographer Danny Lyon‘s images of New York City subway riders in 1966 were featured in an exhibit by MTA Arts & Design. Lyon has had a distinguished career as a photographer and filmmaker, most notably documenting the Civil Rights Movement and motorcycle gangs in the 1960s. Returning to New York City in late 1966, Lyon’s mother gave him the advice, “If you’re bored, just talk to someone on the subway.” Using a Rolleiflex camera and color transparency film, the images in “Underground: 1966” have never been publicly exhibited prior to this.

(via ABC News)

The Art Institute of Chicago Public Domain Collection

The Art Institute of Chicago has announced a redesign of its website, which entails the opening of its digital archive to the masses. Now, anyone will be able to download, print, or use its new public domain collection of 52,438 artworks and counting. Read more

“Cubes,” by Lernert & Sander

The idea for Cubes came to the Dutch artists, Lernert & Sander, when newspaper de Volkskrant commissioned them to take a photo for a food-related feature. The only guidance the newspaper gave was that the work had to be tied to food. But, “food is an overwhelming subject,” Lernert said. “You can go so many different ways. How can you photograph something when you can’t decide?” So they did the only thing that could be done: make all of the food seem equally important by cutting everything into uniform pieces, he said.

As for the rationale behind which food they chose to use for the cubes? That was determined by what they could find in local grocery stores and shops. And the foods couldn’t be processed, at least in the traditional sense. “We realized that if you cut up everything, it has this nastiness of everything becoming processed,” explained Lernert. “That’s the inside story.”

(via bonappetit.com)

Category: Pix

Stanley Kubrick’s Underground NYC

In 1946, Stanley Kubrick, then aged only 18, took these photographs of the New York Subway and had them published by LOOK magazine.  He photographed for the magazine from 1945 to 1950.

According to Helen O’Brian, head of LOOK’s photographic department, Kubrick generated the highest number of published articles of any photographer she had worked with. At the time, Kubrick was the youngest photographer LOOK had had on its books.

(via Mashable & Drew)

The Everyday, Zoomed

As fascinating as it is to see normal, everyday objects magnified 1,000x plus, it’s even more enjoyable to distance yourself from their identification and appreciate their texture, palette, composition, and beauty as stand-alone pieces of art.

These photo serve to supplement my William Legoullon’s Microscopic Drinks post from June 2012, and Caren Albert’s Food Photos, from July 2011. The original article was shared with me by sarak8, and discovered on ViralNova. I’ve narrowed them down to my favorite selections which are, like the sharer of this link,  the most breath-taking. Unlike the original article, however, I’m choosing to hide the object of magnification to allow you the enjoyment of them detached from their object of origin. If you’re dying to know, hover over the image for tooltip or scroll to the bottom of the article for a list.

1. postage stamp, 2. banana slice, 3. blood clot, 4, human eyelash, 5. used dental floss, 6. football jersey, 7. guitar string, 8. needle and thread, 9. salt & pepper, 10. instant coffee crystal, 11. stitches on a dog’s skin, 12. toilet paper, 13. velcro, 14. analog audio groove on a vinyl record

Category: Pix