Thin Places, by Brendon Burton

 
In his ongoing series titled Thin Places, Portland-based photographer Brendon Burton documents battered houses that stand alone in barren fields, amidst an encroaching marsh, or at the edge of the mountain. The decrepit structures have been Burton’s preferred subject matter since 2011 when he began seeking abandoned buildings across the continent that exude a sense of impermanence and the uncanny. “This series is for the sake of satisfying my curiosity about the past and exploring isolated parts of North America. It mixes archeology with fantasy,” he says.

(via This is Colossal)

NYC Subway Construction, by Pierre and Granville Pullis

 

Pierre Pullis had a photography studio on Fulton Street, in New York City, but he spent a lot of time working outside its walls. For about four decades in the first half of the 20th century, he lugged his camera to some rather inconvenient places around the city—including beneath its boulevards. Read more

Sistine Chapel Cartoons, by Raphael

New Online Tool Reveals Raphael’s Sistine Chapel Cartoons in Stunning Detail.

High-resolution scans from the V&A offer an unprecedented view of the Renaissance drawings, down to every last line and wrinkle, with options for Visible, Surface, and Infrared.

Visit the Victoria & Albert Museum to see the tool, here:
https://www.vam.ac.uk/articles/explore-the-raphael-cartoons

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Pantone 2021 Colors of the Year: Illuminating and Ultimate Gray

Practical and rock solid but at the same time warming and optimistic, the union of PANTONE 17-5104 Ultimate Gray + PANTONE 13-0647 Illuminating is one of strength and positivity. It is a story of color that encapsulates deeper feelings of thoughtfulness with the promise of something sunny and friendly. Read more

Snowflakes, by Nathan Myhrvold

It’s easy to forget that the mounds of snow lining sidewalks each winter actually are comprised of billions of tiny crystals with individual grooves and feathered offshoots. A trio of photographs taken by Nathan Myhrvold, though, serves as a stunning reminder of that fact as they expose the intricacies hidden within each molecule.

To capture such crisp images, the Seattle-born photographer traveled to Fairbanks, Alaska, and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, where temperatures plunged to –20 °F. “Water, an incredibly familiar thing to all of us, is quite unfamiliar when you see it in this different view. The intricate beauty of snowflakes is derived from their crystal structure, which is a direct reflection of the microscopic aspects of the water molecule,” he says.

Formally trained in physics, Myhrvold spent 18 months building a custom camera with a cooled-stage microscope to ensure that the flakes remained frozen as he shot. Short-pulse, high-speed LED lights reduce the heat the instrument emits, and at a minimum, its shutter speed clocks in at 500 microseconds. Myhrvold says it’s the highest-resolution snowflake camera in existence.

(via thisiscolossal.com)

Reconstructed Roman Emperors, by Haround Binous

Haroun Binous, an artist from Université de Lausanne, Switzerland, is bringing the emperors back to life in a series of hyper-realistic illustrations. Combining facial recognition AI, Photoshop, and historical references, Binous is reviving all the Roman emperors, from Augustus to Valentinian III.

See the rest at BoredPanda.com