Thin Places, by Brendon Burton

 
In his ongoing series titled Thin Places, Portland-based photographer Brendon Burton documents battered houses that stand alone in barren fields, amidst an encroaching marsh, or at the edge of the mountain. The decrepit structures have been Burton’s preferred subject matter since 2011 when he began seeking abandoned buildings across the continent that exude a sense of impermanence and the uncanny. “This series is for the sake of satisfying my curiosity about the past and exploring isolated parts of North America. It mixes archeology with fantasy,” he says.

(via This is Colossal)

NYC Subway Construction, by Pierre and Granville Pullis

Pierre Pullis had a photography studio on Fulton Street, in New York City, but he spent a lot of time working outside its walls. For about four decades in the first half of the 20th century, he lugged his camera to some rather inconvenient places around the city—including beneath its boulevards. Read more

Sistine Chapel Cartoons, by Raphael

New Online Tool Reveals Raphael’s Sistine Chapel Cartoons in Stunning Detail.

High-resolution scans from the V&A offer an unprecedented view of the Renaissance drawings, down to every last line and wrinkle, with options for Visible, Surface, and Infrared.

Visit the Victoria & Albert Museum to see the tool, here:
https://www.vam.ac.uk/articles/explore-the-raphael-cartoons

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Snowflakes, by Nathan Myhrvold

It’s easy to forget that the mounds of snow lining sidewalks each winter actually are comprised of billions of tiny crystals with individual grooves and feathered offshoots. A trio of photographs taken by Nathan Myhrvold, though, serves as a stunning reminder of that fact as they expose the intricacies hidden within each molecule.

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Category: Pix