Who Drank the Kool-Aid?

Who Drank the Kool-Aid?Yesterday, I took a train to Manhattan to stand among my peers and watch the election results come in. This was the same ritual I performed four years previous—and four years before that—to hear the roar each time the blue strip edged closer to the fated 270.

Last night at 2am, I left Rockefeller Plaza struggling to identify an ache inside me that I hadn’t felt in almost a decade. I kept asking my brother: “how could we be so deluded?” His response was that we weren’t the ones that were deluding ourselves. I understand what he meant, of course. Despite Hillary winning the popular vote, just as Al Gore had in 2000, she didn’t win the election. But this wasn’t the delusion I was feeling. Read more

Hearts of Brooklyn Wine Labels

Hearts of Brooklyn

Red White and Bubbly’s Adam Goldstein hired ERA404 to design the labels for three new wines: The Hearts of Brooklyn Series. ERA404 previously designed the packaging for Brooklyn Wine Company’s Feliz Label Collection and Sparkling White, Altamira’s Sangiovese, and for Pangea’s Sparkling Natural Spring Water.

Illustration for the new pieces was provided by Ryan Seslow. The designs have been applied to packaging, posters, and billboards around Brooklyn.

Indian Stepwells

Water source, meeting place, architectural wonder: The ancient Indian stepwell – a man-made, subterranean well also known as ‘vav’ or ‘baori’ – has been capturing the imagination of pilgrims and travelers for centuries.

Admired for their astonishing intricate and often symmetric designs as well as their significance in Hindi culture as a sacred place for water collection, bathing and meditation, the earliest stepwells date back to around 550 AD. During medieval times, over 3,000 were built in the northern states of India. Today, however, many these ancient relics have been largely forgotten, and now languish in a state of decay.

(via ignant.de)

Cities, Before and After

(via BoredPanda)

Infrared NYC, by Paolo Pettigiani

Taken from various locations within Central Park, Paolo Pettigiani’s eye-catching images portray the Big Apple in a new light. Positioning the city’s skyline as emerging from the park’s bright raspberry treescape, Pettigiani explains, “The purpose is to highlight the majesty and the contrast of nature included in the famous Big Apple’s skyscrapers.”

Having graduated in Visual Design and Communication from the Polytechnic University of Turin, the photographer counts his other big passion as snowboarding, and spends his winters as an instructor on the slopes.

NYC Gardens: On Sale Now!

Own Your Own New York City Garden

Sara gave me a bunch of these little glass vials that came with an order of essential oils for her diffuser. I looked at them, bewildered at what could possibly fit inside them. Then I started to think about how living spaces in New York City are so confined and restrictive—particularly green spaces. I then began to wonder if people around the world would like to share in the cramped, concrete existence that we call New York City living.
Read more