Urban Illumination

Shoe Toss lamps

If you’re on the hunt for a truly unique lamp to accessorize your living room, Etsy is a far better place to start than Ikea. Because that’s the only place you’ll be able to buy this illuminating creation from Ricochet Studio that looks like a pair of shoes tossed over a power line.

Those shoes, however, are made from porcelain with halogen bulbs hidden inside. But while the sneakers are fake, the power lines aren’t. They actually carry electricity to the shoes via their laces, and the sneakers can be adjusted and repositioned however you want them to hang.

There’s only one of the Shoe Toss lamps left, though, and if you want to string it up in your home you’ll have to scrounge up $2,000 and find a place where you’re not going to be constantly clotheslined by the cables.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

July 12th, 2014

Category

Product

Lego Masters

American Gothic

Marco Sodano, Art Director of Geometry Global in Milano Italy, created this unique campaign for Lego: All children are authentic artists with Lego.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

July 1st, 2014

Category

Advertising, Artistic

A Celebration of My Father’s Life

William Paul Citarella

My mom called me on Saturday and asked if I wouldn’t mind putting together a few words that I could read at my father’s Celebration of Life. She said that she heard of other similar events where nobody had read or said anything and she felt that they lacked a little in the spirit of the occasion. I tried to think a little about what that spirit was—honoring someone’s life rather than eulogizing it—and likened it more to The Oscars’ Lifetime Achievement Award than just an epitaph. In my research, I not only wasted hours on YouTube, listening to a lot of self-congratulatory back-patting and exaltation, but realized they all followed the same format. A Lifetime Achievement Award winner’s introduction started with how the introducer had met the award winner and followed quickly with a montage of his or her life.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

June 21st, 2014

Category

Rants

Cyanometer

Cyanometer

This 18th century instrument, designed to measure the blueness of the sky, is called a Cyanometer. The simple device was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc.

The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

June 9th, 2014

Smiles Auto-Awesomed

Auto-Awesome Smile

Google Plus Photos now offers a new form of auto-awesome, their service best known for adding snow to winter photos, sparkles to Christmas tree lights, and turning successive photos into animated gifs. This one is called “Smile” and it truly lives up to its name.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

May 28th, 2014

Lyric-Writing

For the past few months, I’ve been meeting with my friend, Brandon, to hone my skills at writing for theater. It’s fascinating to learn the business behind the curtain and I’m surprised at how fulfilling and enjoyable it can be to distill stories down to dialogue and extrapolate lyrics from presenting a character with a realization, desire, or emotional transition. A song, as Sondheim says, must be based on one succinct “want” from a character and is different from a poem in that it relies on music to buoy it up. A poem, on the other hand, suffers when sung.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

May 23rd, 2014

Category

Literary, Poetry, Verse

Les Couleurs

  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau
  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau
  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau
  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau
  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau
  • Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book. In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

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Posted by

Don Citarella

Posted on

May 6th, 2014

Category

Print