Joshua Ferris’s “The Unnamed”

 

A few weeks ago, I alluded to a web site ERA404 was creating for an author that involved original video footage from Grand Central Station (shot by the inimitable Greg Stadnik) and motion tracking movie clips with Flash video smoothing. I’m proud to say that the site for Joshua Ferris’s “The Unnamed (Reagan Arthur, 2010) is now live. Pop on by to see the final result. I think it came out pretty nicely…but maybe I’m biased. What do you think?

» Visit The Unnamed
» Visit ERA404’s Portfolio

Special Thanks to: Amanda Tobier, Greg Stadnik, Zeh Fernando and the author, himself, for all the original/beautiful content in the site.

ERA404 Launches “Eating Animals”

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ERA404, who has worked with author, Jonathan Safran Foer, on The Project Museum (his personal site) and Who is Augustine? (the exploratory site for Everything is Illuminated) just launched the site for Foer’s much anticipated third book, Eating Animals (Little, Brown and Company, 11/2009). This book, though focused on the same audiences as his fiction, departs from his traditional work in that it is an exploration on his paternal concerns for meat consumption. Watch the trailer, learn about the book and author and interact in the Eating Animals forums.

Be careful, though. He has already converted Natalie Portman. You could be next…

ERA404 Relaunches BroadwayVideo.com

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In 2005, Sharon Haskell contacted ERA404 to work with her on developing the portfolio site for Lorne Michaels‘ production company, Broadway Video. ERA404 previously worked with Ms. Haskell on the site for her motion, still-life and collage work, sharonhaskell.com. The site enjoyed four years of steady traffic until Broadway Video updated their branding and marketing campaign.

This is when Creative Director, Katherine Burke, returned to ERA404 to develop a new site that was in-line with the production facility’s new image. This morning, nearly four years to the day, the new site launched.

The site incorporates 80+ streaming videos in entirely dynamically loaded content, deep-linking through SWFAddress, daily news/press updates with advanced searching and RSS  feeds, archival footage and information about the production facility’s legacy over the last 35 years.

Visit BroadwayVideo.com

ERA404 Relaunches ArthurAshe.org

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Back in February of 2007,  I worked with Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe to create the introduction and site tour for the Official Site of tennis legend, Arthur Ashe (“Honoring Ashe”). Since then, I’ve had the pleasure of designing/developing her personal photography site, a promotional video for Barack Obama, and other work. But this Spring, Ms. Moutoussamy-Ashe returned to request we redesign the complete ArthurAshe.org site (which was originally designed by Sean Lightner and the good folks at Merrill Lynch).

Take a look at the new site, here: www.arthurashe.org

And our 2007 press release: ERA404 Hired to Design Site for Tennis Legend, Arthur Ashe:
“ERA404’s team is young and energetic. They were good listeners and had the ability to grasp the needs of the client,” said Moutoussamy-Ashe. “I had a very pleasant experience.”

Charles Bock Credited Me

Charles Bock acknowledgements

Charles Bock acknowledgementsOne of my favorite authors and good friends, Charles Bock, mentioned me and my studio in the acknowledgements for his New York Times bestselling novel, Beautiful Children.

From Publishers Weekly: 

A wide-ranging portrait of an almost mythically depraved Las Vegas, this sweeping debut takes in everything from the bland misery of suburban Nevada to the exploitative Vegas sex industry. At the nexus of this Dickensian universe is Newell Ewing, a hyperactive 12-year-old boy with a comic-book obsession. One Saturday night, Newell disappears after going out with his socially awkward, considerably older friend. Orbiting around that central mystery are a web of sufferers: Newell’s distraught parents, clinging onto a fraught but tender marriage; a growth-stunted comic book illustrator; a stripper who sacrifices bodily integrity for success; and a gang of street kids. Into their varying Vegas tableaux, Bock stuffs an overwhelming amount of evocative detail and brutally revealing dialogue (sometimes in the form of online chats). The story occasionally gets lost in amateur skin flicks, unmentionable body alterations and tattoos, and the greasy cruelty of adolescents, all of which are given unflinching and often deft closeups. The bleak, orgiastic final sequence, drawing together the disparate plot threads, feels contrived, but Bock’s Vegas has hope, compassion and humor, and his set pieces are sharp and accomplished.

I definitely recommend you pick up a copy: